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Liquid Crystals

Liquid crytals (LCs) are probably the most exciting state of matter. They attract scientists across disciplines such as chemistry, physics, materials science, and engineering—theorists and experimentalists alike. These days, you can buy quite affordable LCD TV sets around the corner, but that's just one of the many things liquid crystals can do. The selection of recent research articles presented below illustrates the broad interest in this area of soft condensed matter.

Recommended Reading

J. W. Goodby, P. J. Collings, T. Kato, C. Tschierske, H. Gleeson, P. Raynes (Eds)
Handbook of Liquid Crystals
2nd edition, Wiley-VCH, Weinheim, 2014.

Find all articles on liquid crystals in Wiley Online Library...

See the International Liquid Crystal Society's website.

Recent Articles

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Controlling the Photonic Properties of Cholesteric Cellulose Nanocrystal Films with Magnets

Controlling the Photonic Properties of Cholesteric Cellulose Nanocrystal Films with Magnets

Commercial magnets can be used to control the optical properties of cholesteric cellulose nanocrystals films, resulting in photonic structures with an unprecedented photonic response. This striking effect unlocks new possibilities in the already broad range of photonic applications of such systems; from colorants, to sensors and security devices.

[Communication]
Bruno Frka-Petesic, Giulia Guidetti, Gen Kamita, Silvia Vignolini
Adv. Mater., June 21, 2017, https://doi.org/10.1002/adma.201701469 Read article

Electroluminescent and Optoelectronic Properties of OLEDs with Bay-Extended, Distorted Perylene Esters as Emitter Materials

Electroluminescent and Optoelectronic Properties of OLEDs with Bay‐Extended, Distorted Perylene Esters as Emitter Materials

Different perylene derivatives are tested as emitter materials in organic light-emitting diodes. After thermal treatment, the emission can be altered due to the formation of a denser packed nanofilm. This behavior can be explained by the formation of excited dimers and is in agreement with prior studies.

[Article]
Joachim Vollbrecht, Simon Blazy, Philipp Dierks, Samuel Peurifoy, Harald Bock, Heinz Kitzerow
ChemPhysChem, June 06, 2017, https://doi.org/10.1002/cphc.201700502 Read article

Hierarchical and Heterogeneous Bioinspired Composites—Merging Molecular Self-Assembly with Additive Manufacturing

Hierarchical and Heterogeneous Bioinspired Composites—Merging Molecular Self‐Assembly with Additive Manufacturing

A multiscale heterogeneous composite formed via combining bottom-up self-assembly, biomimetic mineralization, and top-down additive manufacturing is reported. The composites are ordered constructs with an organic–inorganic interpenetrating nanostructure aligned over centimeter length-scales, with structural features as small as 10 nm. The composites display a hierarchical structure, composition, and crack-resist mechanics on similar length scales as biological materials like the bone-cartilage composite.

[Full Paper]
Anand K. Rajasekharan, Romain Bordes, Carl Sandström, Magnus Ekh, Martin Andersson
Small, June 01, 2017, https://doi.org/10.1002/smll.201700550 Read article

Tunable Gas Sensing Gels by Cooperative Assembly

Tunable Gas Sensing Gels by Cooperative Assembly

Self-assembled hybrid gels result from the unconventional combination of functional components, liquid crystals for reporting, ionic liquid as solvent, biopolymer as matrix, giving rise to molecular recognition properties not seen in the individual components. Thin films prepared from the gels are robust and exhibit dual optical/electrical stimuli-responsive properties in the presence of gases.

[Full Paper]
Abid Hussain, Ana T. S. Semeano, Susana I. C. J. Palma, Ana S. Pina, José Almeida, Bárbara F. Medrado, Ana C. C. S. Pádua, Ana L. Carvalho, Madalena Dionísio, Rosamaria W. C. Li, Hugo Gamboa, Rein V. Ulijn, Jonas Gruber, Ana C. A. Roque
Adv. Funct. Mater., May 29, 2017, https://doi.org/10.1002/adfm.201700803 Read article

Inside Cover: Self-Assembled Liquid-Crystalline Ion Conductors in Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells: Effects of Molecular Sensitizers on Their Performance (ChemPlusChem 6/2017)

Inside Cover: Self‐Assembled Liquid‐Crystalline Ion Conductors in Dye‐Sensitized Solar Cells: Effects of Molecular Sensitizers on Their Performance (ChemPlusChem 6/2017)

The cover picture shows dye-coated TiO2 particles and a nanostructured liquid crystal that forms two-dimensional ion transport pathways, with ions (red spheres) localized in between non-polar layers (blue). Dye-sensitized solar cells employing these liquid-crystalline ion conductors as electrolytes show more efficient energy conversion when based on organic dye sensitizers as compared with ruthenium metal–organic dye sensitizers. Details are given in the Full Paper by T. Kato and co-workers on page 834 in Issue 6, 2017 (DOI: 10.1002/cplu.201700099).

[Cover Picture]
Daniel Högberg, Bartolome Soberats, Masafumi Yoshio, Yurika Mizumura, Satoshi Uchida, Lars Kloo, Hiroshi Segawa, Takashi Kato
ChemPlusChem, May 10, 2017, https://doi.org/10.1002/cplu.201700174 Read article

Highly Efficient Virus Rejection with Self-Organized Membranes Based on a Crosslinked Bicontinuous Cubic Liquid Crystal

Highly Efficient Virus Rejection with Self‐Organized Membranes Based on a Crosslinked Bicontinuous Cubic Liquid Crystal

Virus rejection by a liquid crystal membrane is realized for the first time using a self-assembling mesogen stabilized by crosslinking in an ordered bicontinuous cubic phase. This structure allows for the level of control over pore size distribution necessary for efficient rejection of small particles including viruses while allowing for permeation of water. Applying pressurization to the membrane prior to testing results in improved virus removal efficiency and water flux.

[Communication]
Nicolas Marets, Daniel Kuo, Jason R. Torrey, Takeshi Sakamoto, Masahiro Henmi, Hiroyuki Katayama, Takashi Kato
Adv. Healthcare Mater., May 09, 2017, https://doi.org/10.1002/adhm.201700252 Read article

Self-Assembled Liquid-Crystalline Ion Conductors in Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells: Effects of Molecular Sensitizers on Their Performance

Self‐Assembled Liquid‐Crystalline Ion Conductors in Dye‐Sensitized Solar Cells: Effects of Molecular Sensitizers on Their Performance

Bright future: Nanostructured liquid crystals forming self-assembled two-dimensional ion-transport pathways have been applied as electrolytes in dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs; see figure). DSSCs based on these liquid-crystalline (LC) electrolytes and organic dye sensitizers show more efficient energy conversion than LC-DSSCs based on ruthenium metal–organic dyes.

[Full Paper]
Daniel Högberg, Bartolome Soberats, Masafumi Yoshio, Yurika Mizumura, Satoshi Uchida, Lars Kloo, Hiroshi Segawa, Takashi Kato
ChemPlusChem, April 26, 2017, https://doi.org/10.1002/cplu.201700099 Read article

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